re·​sil·​iency.

1. a hopeful thing felt in the heart.

2. the ability to adapt and transform to meet the challenges we face.

The Resiliency Project is a community-driven rewilding effort in the Cowichan Valley. Our vision is to create a network of pollinator meadows throughout our community, to create habitat, increase local biodiversity, and engage the community in nature-based education. We are also working to encourage local residents to plant native wildflower species in their own yards and gardens. Planting native plants is a powerful act of ecological healing, offering essential sources of food to a huge diversity of beneficial insects including pollinators. As climate instability increases, this is a meaningful action that we can take as a community to mitigate localized biodiversity collapse. Over the past two years, we have planted five native wildflower meadows in community parks and public shared green spaces, with a committed group of volunteers. We invite all members of the community who are interested in rewilding to come out and get involved in this local movement! We have volunteer positions open, and have ongoing opportunities through workshops and work-bees to come out and learn and get your hands in the dirt! For more information about these opportunities, please email hannahsophia@cowichangreencommunity.org

 

 

Community Native Seed Bank
Located at the Cowichan Farm and Food Hub, 2431 Beverly St.


We have been working on building the community native seed bank, which now features 25 different native species, all of which are fully accessible and free to community members working on rewilding projects. The seeds are stored in our temperature and humidity-controlled seed vault. These seeds are gathered ethically and carefully by our great team of staff and volunteers and stored with care, to preserve their vitality. To access the seed bank, please email hannahsophia@cowichangreencommunity.org or come by and visit us. We are open Tuesday – Saturday 9 am – 4:30 pm.

Community Engagement

At the Resiliency Project, we work to engage the community in the work that we are doing. We run ongoing workshops focused on rewilding, pollinators, and native plants. We also organize workshops focused on earth-based textile explorations, such as basket weaving using invasive species.

We have created a collaborative relationship with the Quamichan School Science 9 teachers, working with their students on the “Healthy Waterways” curriculum, which is a program developed by the Cowichan Land Trust to educate and engage students in their local watershed. Through this collaboration, we have engaged with over 120 grade 9 students, working on the wetland spiral project and the boulevard meadow in front of the Farm and Food Hub. We have also worked with several other schools to provide nature-based hands-on educational opportunities. Some of these activities include: building native bee houses, planting native wildflowers, gathering seeds for the community seed bank, and sowing these seeds in meadow areas.

The Meadows!

Cowichan Valley Open Learning Co-op School Meadow
1033 Nagle St, Cairnsmore, Duncan BC

This meadow is located at the local CVOLC school site and was planted several years ago by a group of students. We have been expanding the species of native wildflowers on the site, and working with several teachers to engage their students in the work. We are in the process of creating a ‘bee village’ on the site with the students. We are also working on creating signage for the area so that there can be more potential for self-guided exploration of the area. We hope that this school meadow can be a demonstration of what is possible with a collaboration between our meadow makers and local schools. Our vision is that every school should have a learning meadow, where students can plant, harvest and engage in re-wilding efforts.

Kin Park Meadow
5789 Alderlea Street, Duncan BC

Kin Park Youth Urban Farm is a project in a local Duncan park called Kinsmen Park, run by the Cowichan Green Community. Their focus has been primarily on growing food crops and planting fruit trees. We are working with the Kin Park team to re-wild several areas of the park, and use the planting areas to expand the meadow area that we planted in the spring. We are using a variety of meadow-making techniques, including using permaculture techniques to build soil, in preparation for wildflower planting.

Boulevard Meadow at the Cowichan Farm and Food Hub
2431 Beverly St, Duncan BC

We have just started planting this site on the wide boulevard in front of the Garden Education Centre, a project run by the Cowichan Green Community. This meadow is 300 ft long, and 5 ft wide. We are using three different meadow-making techniques on-site, so that this area can be used as a demonstration and experimentation area. We hope to be able to use the meadow as a teaching area, to show different types of meadow making that is possible in a conventional suburban lawn. We also hope to use this area to spark interest in planting native wildflower species in their own boulevards and lawns.

Wetland Spiral at the Cowichan Farm and Food Hub
2431 Beverly St, Duncan BC

This re-wilding project is being led by Amanda Macaro, one of our former interns from the Canadian Conservation Corps. We are creating this site at the Garden Education Centre, focusing on native wetland species. The vision for this site is to create a demonstration garden of different wetland species, a learning space for community groups and students who visit the site, and an area to continue to expand our seed-saving capacities at the Garden Education Centre, as we build the community seed bank.

Rotary Park Community Meadow
545 Al Wilson Grove, Duncan BC

This is the first area that we worked on as a community, to rewild a large area in a Cottonwood grove in a local park bordering the Cowichan River. This season, we have planted over 500 plants on this site, and have seeded a large area with a diversity of wildflowers. We have also continued to work with the City of Duncan to build our working relationship and discuss future possibilities to work together to re-wild more areas of our shared green spaces.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.